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Where Is This Pandemic Headed?

The pandemic has killed more than one million people around the world, at least 210,000 in the United States alone. The illness has infiltrated the White House and infected the president. Today, we offer an update on measures to fight the coronavirus and try to predict the outbreak’s course. Guest: Donald G. McNeil Jr., a…

How a Small Bar Battled to Survive the Coronavirus

This episode contains strong language.  Jack Nicas, a technology reporter for The New York Times, moved to Oakland, Calif., five years ago. When he arrived, he set out to find a bar of choice. It quickly became the Hatch. Unpretentious, cheap and relaxed, the Hatch was a successful small business until the coronavirus hit. After…

The Latest on the President’s Health

On Saturday morning, the doctors treating President Trump for the coronavirus held a news conference outside Walter Reed National Military Medical Center — a show of strength, aimed at reassuring the American public that he was in capable hands. But instead of allaying concern, it raised questions, casting doubt on the timeline of the president’s…

One Million Lives

They came from Tel Aviv, Aleppo and a “small house by the river.” They were artists, whiskey drinkers and mbira players. They were also fathers, sisters and best friends. Today, we hear people from around the world reflect on those they’ve lost.  For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.

Special Edition: The Pandemic Reaches the President

He assured the country the pandemic would “disappear” soon. Then he tested positive. We explore how President Trump testing positive for the coronavirus could affect the last days of the 2020 race — and consider what might happen next. Guests: Peter Baker and Maggie Haberman, White House correspondents for The Times. For more information about…

The Field: The Fight For Voting Rights in Florida

This episode contains strong language.  During much of this election cycle, Julius Irving of Gainesville, Fla., spent his days trying to get former felons registered to vote. He would tell them about Florida’s Amendment Four, a ballot initiative that extended the franchise to those who had, in the past, been convicted on felony charges —…

A User’s Guide to Mail-In Voting

The pandemic will mean that many more Americans vote by mail this year. All 50 states require people to register before they can cast a mail-in vote. But from there, the rules diverge wildly. Some states send mail-in forms automatically, others require voters to request an absentee ballot. And while a majority of states accept…

Chaos and Contempt: The First Presidential Debate

This episode contains strong language. Both presidential candidates had clear goals for their first debate on Tuesday. For Joseph R. Biden Jr., the contest was an opportunity to consolidate his lead in polls before Election Day. Voters appear to be leaning toward the former vice president, and the stage offered him a chance to allay…

The President’s Taxes

Russ Buettner and Susanne Craig, investigative reporters for The Times, have pored over two decades and thousands of pages of documents on Donald J. Trump’s tax information, up to and including his time in the White House. What they found was an existential threat to the image he has constructed about his wealth and lifestyle….

The Past, Present and Future of Amy Coney Barrett

Judge Amy Coney Barrett, President Trump’s pick to fill the empty seat on the Supreme Court, is a product of the conservative legal movement of the 1980s. She clerked for Justice Antonin Scalia, a giant of conservative jurisprudence, and his influence is evident throughout her judicial career. Opponents of abortion, in particular, are hoping that…