Uncategorized

A Conversation With Senator Raphael Warnock

Republican-led legislatures are racing to restrict voting rights, in a broad political effort that first began in the state of Georgia. To many Democrats, it’s no coincidence that Georgia — once a Republican stronghold — has just elected its first Black senator: Raphael Warnock. Today, we speak to the senator about his path from pastorship…

A National Campaign to Restrict Voting

Georgia, a once reliably red state, has been turning more and more purple in recent years. In response, the Republican state legislature has passed a package of laws aimed at restricting voting. Today, we look at those measures and how Democrats are bracing for similar laws to be passed elsewhere in the country.  Guest: Nick…

The George Floyd Case Goes to Court

On the docket on Monday at a Minneapolis courthouse is the biggest police brutality case in the United States in three decades: the trial of Derek Chauvin, a white former police officer accused of killing George Floyd, a Black man, last year. The case centers on a 10-minute video, shot by a bystander, showing Mr….

The Sunday Read: ‘Rembrandt in the Blood’

It was in the winter of 2016 that Jan Six, a Dutch art dealer based in Amsterdam, made a discovery that would upend his life. He was leafing through a Christie’s catalog when he spotted a painting featuring a young man wearing a dazed look, a lace collar and a proto-Led Zeppelin coif. Christie’s had…

A Nursing Home’s First Day Out of Lockdown

The Good Shepherd Nursing Home in West Virginia lifted its coronavirus lockdown in February. For months, residents had been confined to their rooms, unable to mix. But with everybody now vaccinated, it was finally time to see one another again. We share some of the relief and joy about the tip-toe back to normalcy for…

The State of Vaccinations

The United States has never undertaken a vaccination campaign of the scale and speed of the Covid-19 program. Despite a few glitches, the country appears to be on track to offer shots to all adults who want one by May 1. We look at the ups and downs in the American vaccination campaign and describe…

Joe Biden’s 30-Year Quest for Gun Control

In less than a week, the United States has seen two deadly mass shootings: one in Boulder, Colo., and another in the Atlanta area. These events prompted President Biden to address the nation on Tuesday. In his speech, he said it was time to ban assault weapons. Mr. Biden has been here before. He has…

A Food Critic Loses Her Sense of Smell

For Tejal Rao, a restaurant critic for The Times, a sense of smell is crucial to what she does. After she contracted the coronavirus, it disappeared. It felt almost instant. “If you’re not used to it, you don’t know what’s going on,” she said. “It’s almost like wearing a blindfold.” We follow Tejal on her…

The Cruel Reality of Long Covid-19

This episode contains strong language. Ivan Agerton of Bainbridge Island, Wash., was usually unflappable. A 50-year-old adventure photographer and former marine, he has always been known to be calm in a crisis. Soon after testing positive for the coronavirus this fall, he began experiencing psychosis. He spent Christmas in a psychiatric ward. Today, we hear…

The Sunday Read: ‘Beauty of the Beasts’

The bright elastic throats of anole lizards, the Fabergé abdomens of peacock spiders and the curling, iridescent and ludicrously long feathers of birds-of-paradise. A number of animal species possess beautifully conspicuous and physically burdensome features. Many biologists have long fit these tasking aesthetic displays into a more utilitarian view of evolution. However, a new generation…