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Europe’s Vaccination Problem

Europe’s vaccination process was expected to be well-orchestrated and efficient. So far, it’s been neither. Sabrina Tavernise, a national correspondent for The Times, spoke with our colleague Matina Stevis-Gridneff about Europe’s problems and why things could get worse before they get better. Guest: Matina Stevis-Gridneff, the Brussels correspondent for The New York Times, covering the…

The Sunday Read: ‘The Ghost Writer’

The author Philip Roth, who died in 2018, was not sure whether he wanted to be the subject of a biography. In the end, he decided that he wanted to be known and understood. His search for a biographer was long and fraught — Mr. Roth parted ways with two, courted one and sued another…

Odessa, Part 3: The Band Bus Quarantine

Last fall, as Odessa High School brought some students back to campus with hybrid instruction, school officials insisted mask wearing, social distancing and campus contact tracing would keep students and faculty safe. And at the beginning of the semester, things seemed to be going OK. But then a spike in coronavirus cases hit town, putting…

The Case Against Derek Chauvin

In Minneapolis, the tension is palpable as the city awaits the outcome of the trial of Derek Chauvin, the police officer accused of murdering George Floyd last summer. The court proceedings have been both emotional — the video of Mr. Floyd’s death has been played over and over — and technical. At the heart of…

Targeting Overseas Tax Shelters

The I.R.S. says that Bristol Myers Squibb, America’s second-largest drug company, has engaged a tax-shelter setup that has deprived the United States of $1.4 billion in tax revenue. The Biden administration is looking to put an end to such practices to pay for its policy ambitions, including infrastructure like improving roads and bridges and revitalizing…

A Vast Web of Vengeance

How one woman with a grudge was able to slander an entire family online, while the sites she used avoided blame. Sign up here to get The Daily in your inbox each morning. And for an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter.  For more information…

A Military That Murders Its Own People

Two months ago, Myanmar’s military carried out a coup, deposing the country’s elected civilian leader, Aung San Suu Kyi, and closing the curtains on a five-year experiment with democracy.  Since then, the Burmese people have expressed their discontent through protest and mass civil disobedience. The military has responded with brutal violence.  We look at the…

The Sunday Read: ‘The Beauty of 78.5 Million Followers’

During the pandemic, cheerleader-ish girls performing slithery hip-hop dances to rap music on TikTok has been the height of entertainment — enjoyed both genuinely and for laughs. Addison Rae, one such TikToker, is the second-most-popular human being on the platform, having amassed a following larger than the population of the United Kingdom. In seeking to…

Inside the Biden Infrastructure Plan

President Biden is pushing the boundaries of how most Americans think of infrastructure. In a speech on Wednesday, he laid out his vision for revitalizing the nation’s infrastructure in broad, sweeping terms: evoking racial equality, climate change and support for the middle class. His multitrillion-dollar plan aims not only to repair roads and bridges, but…

A Union Drive at Amazon

Since its earliest days, Amazon has been anti-union, successfully quashing any attempt by workers to organize. A group of workers at an Amazon warehouse in Bessemer, Ala., just might change that — depending on the outcome of a vote this week. We look at how their effort came together and what it means for the…