Month: March 2022

How Democrats Evened the Congressional Map

In the past, Republicans have been able to secure what some see as an unfair political advantage by gerrymandering political districts. But after the recent redrawing of zones, the congressional map across the U.S. is perhaps more evenly split than at any time in the past 50 years. What happened? Guest: Nate Cohn, a domestic…

The Political Lives of Clarence and Ginni Thomas

A series of text messages released in the past week show how Ginni Thomas, wife of Justice Clarence Thomas of the Supreme Court, urged White House officials to push to overturn the result of the 2020 election. There has never been a spouse of a sitting justice who has been as overt a political activist…

Senator Joe Manchin’s Conflict of Interest

At every step of his political career, Senator Joe Manchin III has helped a West Virginia power plant that is the sole customer of his private coal business, including by blocking ambitious climate action. A Times investigation has revealed the strands of the unusual relationship between Mr. Manchin and that especially dirty power plant, showing…

Four Million Ukrainians in Limbo

Since the beginning of Russia’s war in Ukraine, 10 million Ukrainians — about a quarter of the population — have been displaced, and about four million have fled the country. Iryna Baramidze is one of them. From a middle-class neighborhood of Kyiv, the Ukrainian capital, she has been married to her husband for 12 years…

The Sunday Read: ‘Nurses Have Finally Learned What They’re Worth’

Demand for traveling nurses skyrocketed during the pandemic. In March 2020, there were over 12,000 job opportunities for traveling nurses, but by early December of that year, the number had grown to more than 30,000 open positions. Lauren Hilgers details the experiences of America’s traveling nurses and questions whether this “boom” will continue. Myriad factors…

‘The Dreams We Had Are Like a Dream’

Since the Taliban took control of Afghanistan last year, thousands of women and girls who were in school or had jobs were forced back into their homes. The Daily producers Lynsea Garrison and Stella Tan have been talking to women and girls across the country about their lives under Taliban rule — and about what…

Ukraine Puts Putin’s Playbook to the Test

From the outside, Russia’s relentless bombardment of Ukraine looks indiscriminate and improvised. But the approach is part of an approach devised decades ago in Chechnya. The Times journalist Carlotta Gall, who covered the Chechen conflict, explains why wars fought by Russia some 30 years ago could inform what happens next in Ukraine. Guest: Carlotta Gall,…

The Confirmation Hearing of Ketanji Brown Jackson

Democratic support for Judge Ketanji Brown Jackson, who could become the first Black woman to serve as a Supreme Court justice, was never in much doubt. Less certain was the depth of Republican opposition. To analyze how the arguments have played out so far in her confirmation hearing, we look at four key moments. Guest:…

Will Sanctioning Oligarchs Change the War?

Among the actions taken by the West to punish Moscow for the invasion of Ukraine is the blacklisting of the incredibly rich and politically connected Russian businessmen known as oligarchs. But how could sanctions on Russia’s superwealthy increase the pressure on President Vladimir V. Putin to end the war? Guest: Matt Apuzzo, a reporter for…

Could the U.S. See Another Covid Wave?

More than two years into the pandemic, coronavirus infections are surging in China and nations in Europe. The reason: BA.2, a highly contagious version of the Omicron variant. At the same time, the United States is doing away with a number of pandemic restrictions, with mask mandates ending and businesses no longer requiring proof of…