Month: January 2022

We Need to Talk About Covid, Part 2: A Conversation with Dr. Fauci

America, it seems, might be at a turning point in how we think about and respond to the pandemic. Yet, the U.S., at this moment, is still in the midst of crisis — thousands of people are in hospital and dying every day. In the second part of our exploration of the state of the…

The Sunday Read: ‘The Joys (and Challenges) of Sex After 70’

Today, Maggie Jones explores the overlooked topic of geriatric intercourse. Profiling older couples for whom sex is still important, she considers the obstacles and joys of having intercourse over the age of 70, and the way society has begun to talk more openly about it in recent years. As bodies change, Jones writes, good sex…

What Beef Can Tell Us About the American Economy

During the pandemic, the price of beef shot up. Wholesale beef prices increased more than 40 percent — more than 70 percent for certain cuts of steak.  The conventional wisdom was that price increases simply reflected the chaos that the coronavirus had caused in the supply chain. But there’s evidence that they were in fact…

Biden Gets a Supreme Court Pick

On Wednesday, it was revealed that Justice Stephen Breyer, the senior member of the Supreme Court’s liberal wing, will retire from the bench.  Democrats, and many on the left, will have breathed a sigh of relief. His decision has given President Biden the chance to nominate a successor while Democrats control the Senate.  We take…

We Need to Talk About Covid, Part 1

It appears that the United States may be at a turning point in the pandemic. The contagiousness of the Omicron variant has many people resigned to the fact that they probably will be infected; this variant is, relative to its predecessors and in most cases, milder; and there is universal vaccine access for those old…

Why Garden Parties May Be Boris Johnson’s Undoing

When allegations first emerged in November about parties held at 10 Downing Street, the residence and offices of the British prime minister, during a strict Covid lockdown, Prime Minister Boris Johnson waved them away.  Yet in the weeks since, the scandal has only grown, with public outrage building as more instances and details of lockdown…

A Portrait of a Paralympian Who Died by Euthanasia

Marieke Vervoort was a champion Paralympic athlete from Belgium. In 2016, Vervoort, who had a progressive disease, announced her retirement from professional sports and spoke of her desire to undergo euthanasia. Today, we hear Vervoort’s story from Lynsey Addario, a photojournalist who documented the end of her life. “In most of my experiences covering Iraq…

The Sunday Read: ‘How Disgust Explains Everything’

What is “disgust”? Molly Young, a journalist with The New York Times, considers the evolutionary and social uses of this “universal aspect of life” to identify the impact of disgust in its physical, psychological and linguistic manifestations. Young explains the different forms of disgust, analyzing how the reactions they elicit play out in the body…

What the ‘Djokovic Affair’ Revealed About Australia

Novak Djokovic, the world No. 1 player in men’s tennis, had a lot at stake going into this year’s Australian Open. A win there would have made him the most decorated male tennis player in history.  But he arrived in the country without having had a Covid-19 vaccination, flying in the face of Australia’s rules,…

Microsoft and the Metaverse

Microsoft announced this week that it was acquiring Activision Blizzard, the maker of video games such as Call of Duty and Candy Crush, in a deal valued at nearly $70 billion. Microsoft, the owner of Xbox, said the acquisition was a step toward gaining a foothold in the metaverse. But what exactly is the metaverse?…