Month: October 2021

The Sunday Read: “Fear on Cape Cod as Sharks Hunt Again”

Over the past decade, the waters around Cape Cod have become host to one of the densest seasonal concentrations of adult white sharks in the world. Acoustic tagging data suggest the animals trickle into the region during lengthening days in May, increase in abundance throughout summer, peak in October and mostly depart by Thanksgiving. To…

A Delicate Compromise in the Capitol

President Biden and Democratic leaders say they have an agreement on a historic social spending bill that they have spent months negotiating. But liberals in Congress demanded assurances that the package would survive before they would agree to an immediate vote on a separate $1 trillion infrastructure bill. Today, we explore why compromise remains a…

The Ahmaud Arbery Trial

In the coming days, a trial will begin to determine whether the fatal shooting of Amaud Arbery, an unarmed Black man, by two armed white men is considered murder under Georgia state law. Today, we explore why that may be a difficult case for prosecutors to make. Guest: Richard Fausset, a correspondent based in Atlanta…

The Story of Kyrsten Sinema

As congressional Democrats dramatically scale back the most ambitious social spending bill since the 1960s, they’re placing much of the blame on moderates who have demanded changes. One senator, Kyrsten Sinema of Arizona, has played an outsized role in shaping the bill — but has remained quiet about why. Today, we explore what brought her…

Why Spending Too Little Could Backfire on Democrats

When Democrats first set out to expand the social safety net, they envisioned a piece of legislation as transformational as what the party has achieved in the 1960s. In the process, they hoped that they’d win back the working-class voters the party had since lost. But now that they’re on the brink of reaching a…

A Threat to China’s Economy

Every once in a while a company grows so big and messy that governments fear what would happen to the broader economy if it were to fail. In China, Evergrande, a sprawling real estate developer, is that company. Evergrande has the distinction of being the world’s most debt-saddled property developer and has been on life…

The Sunday Read: ‘Who Is the Bad Art Friend?’

On June 24, 2015, Dawn Dorland, an essayist and aspiring novelist, did perhaps the kindest, most consequential thing she might ever do in her life. She donated one of her kidneys — and elected to do it in a slightly unusual and particularly altruistic way. As a so-called nondirected donation, her kidney was not meant…

Qaddafi’s Son is Alive, and He Wants to Take Back Libya

Before the Arab Spring, Seif al-Islam el-Qaddafi, the second son of the Libyan dictator Col. Muammar el-Qaddafi, was establishing himself as a serious figure internationally. Then, the Arab Spring came to Libya. His father and brothers were killed and Seif himself was captured by rebels and taken to the western mountains of Libya. For years,…

A Showdown in Chicago

Chicago is in the midst of a crime wave — but there is also a question about whether police officers will show up for work. That’s because of a showdown between the mayor, Lori Lightfoot, and the police union over a coronavirus vaccine mandate. Some 30,000 city workers are subject to the mandate, but no…

What’s Next for Biden’s Climate Plan?

The Clean Electricity Program has been at the heart of President Biden’s climate agenda since he took office. But passage was always going to come down to a single senator: Joe Manchin of West Virginia. With Mr. Manchin’s support now extremely unlikely, where does that leave American climate policy? Guest: Coral Davenport, a correspondent covering…