Month: July 2021

The End of America’s 20-Year War

After a 20-year war, the United States has effectively ended its operations in Afghanistan with little fanfare. In recent weeks, the Americans have quietly vacated their sprawling military bases in the nation, and without giving Afghan security forces prior notice. What does this withdrawal look like on the ground? Guest: Thomas Gibbons-Neff, a correspondent in…

A Divisive New Treatment for Alzheimer’s

When the F.D.A. approved the drug Aduhelm, the first Alzheimer’s treatment to receive the agency’s endorsement in almost two decades, it gave hope to many. But the decision was contentious; some experts say there’s not enough evidence that the treatment can address cognitive symptoms. What is the story behind this new drug? Guest: Pam Belluck,…

The Rise of Delta

The Delta variant of the coronavirus is threatening to put the world in an entirely new stage of the pandemic. The variant is spreading fast, particularly in places with low vaccination rates — it is thought to be around 50 percent more transmissible than previous versions. What can be done to stop Delta, and how…

The Debate Over Critical Race Theory

In Loudoun County, Va., a fierce debate has been raging for months inside normally sleepy school board meetings. At the heart of this anger is critical race theory, a once obscure academic framework for understanding racism in the United States. How, exactly, did critical race theory enter American public life, and what does this debate…

A New Era in College Sports

Throughout its 115-year history, the N.C.A.A.’s bedrock principle has been that student-athletes should be amateurs and not allowed to profit off their fame. This week, after years of agitation and legislation, the rule was changed. What will this new era of college sports look like? Guest: Alan Blinder, a reporter covering college sports for The…