Month: June 2021

Inside the U.F.O. Report

Recently, the government released a long-awaited report: a look at unexplained aerial phenomena. We explore the report and what implications it may have. Will it do anything to quell theories of extraterrestrial visitors? Guest: Julian E. Barnes, a national security reporter for The New York Times.  Sign up here to get The Daily in your…

The Collapse of Champlain Towers

A few years ago, engineers sounded alarm bells about Champlain Towers, a residential building in Surfside, Fla. Last week, disaster struck and the towers collapsed. At least 11 residents have been confirmed dead and 150 more are still unaccounted for. What caused the building to fail, and why are so many people still missing? Guest:…

What the Japanese Think of the Olympics

After last year’s postponement, both the International Olympic Committee and the Japanese government are determined that the Tokyo Games will take place this summer. But the public in Japan appears unconvinced: About 85 percent of people say they fear that the Olympics will cause a rebound of the virus in the country. Will the sense…

The Sunday Read: ‘The Woman Who Made van Gogh’

Neglected by art history for decades, Jo van Gogh-Bonger, the sister-in-law to Vincent van Gogh, is finally being recognized as the force who opened the world’s eyes to his genius. This story was written by Russell Shorto and recorded by Audm. To hear more audio stories from publications like The New York Times, download Audm…

From Opinion: Anthony Fauci Is Pissed Off

On this episode of Sway, a podcast from NYT Opinion, America’s chief immunologist responds to the recent leak of his emails, being compared to Hitler, and weighs in on the Wuhan lab-leak theory.  Every Monday and Thursday on Sway, Kara Swisher investigates power: who has it, who’s been denied it and who dares to defy…

Day X, Part 5: Defensive Democracy

In this episode, we get answers on just how bad the problem of far-right infiltration in the German military and police really is — and how Germany is trying to address it.  We learn about Germany’s “defensive democracy,” which was designed after World War II to protect the country against threats from the inside. One…

The Struggles of India’s Vaccine Giant

When the coronavirus hit, the Serum Institute of India, the world’s largest vaccine maker, seemed uniquely positioned to help. It struck a deal with AstraZeneca, promising a billion vaccine doses to low- and middle-income nations.  Earlier this year, a ban instituted by Prime Minister Narendra Modi put a stop to those plans.  What has that…

Lessons from the Demise of a Voting Rights Bill

The For the People Act, a bill created by House Democrats after the 2018 midterm elections, could have been the most sweeping expansion of voting rights in a generation. On Tuesday night, however, Senate Republicans filibustered the bill before it could even be debated. What lessons can we take from its demise?  Guest: Nicholas Fandos,…

Policing and the New York Mayoral Race

In the wake of last year’s Black Lives Matter protests, a central question of the New York City mayoral contest has become: Is New York safer with more or fewer police officers? Today, we see this tension play out in a single household, between Yumi Mannarelli and her mother, Misako Shimada. Guests: Misako Shimada and…

A Crucial Voting Rights Decision

How does the 1965 Voting Rights Act work? That is the question in front of the Supreme Court as it rules on a pair of Arizona laws from 2016 — the most important voting rights case in a decade. What arguments have been made in the case? And what implications will the decision have? Guest:…