Month: February 2021

The Sunday Read: ‘Sigrid Johnson Was Black. A DNA Test Said She Wasn’t’

It all started when Sigrid E. Johnson was 62. She got a call from an old friend, asking her to participate in a study about DNA ancestry tests and ethnic identity. She agreed. Ms. Johnson thought she knew what the outcome would be. When she was 16, her mother told her that she had been…

Odessa, Part 1: The School Year Begins

Odessa is a four-part audio documentary series about one West Texas high school reopening during the pandemic — and the teachers, students and nurses affected in the process. For the past six months, The New York Times has documented students’ return to class at Odessa High School from afar through Google hangouts, audio diaries, phone…

Fate, Domestic Terrorism and the Nomination of Merrick Garland

Five years ago, Judge Merrick B. Garland became a high-profile casualty of Washington’s political dysfunction. President Barack Obama selected him to fill the Supreme Court vacancy created by the death of Justice Antonin Scalia, but Senate Republicans blocked his nomination. In the process, Mr. Garland became known for the job he didn’t get. Now, after…

When Covid Hit Nursing Homes, Part 2: ‘They’re Not Giving Us an Ending’

When the pandemic was bearing down on New York last March, Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s administration issued a directive that allowed Covid-19 patients to be discharged into nursing homes in a bid to free up hospital beds for the sickest patients. It was a decision that had the potential to cost thousands of lives. Today, in…

When Covid Hit Nursing Homes, Part 1: ‘My Mother Died Alone’

When New York was the epicenter of the pandemic in the United States, Gov. Andrew Cuomo emerged as a singular, strong leader. Now his leadership is embattled, particularly over the extent of deaths in nursing homes during the peak. Today, in the first of two parts on what went wrong in New York’s nursing homes,…

The Legacy of Rush Limbaugh

The conservative talk radio host Rush Limbaugh died last week. He was 70. For decades, he broadcast mistrust and grievance into the homes of millions. Mr. Limbaugh helped create an entire ecosystem of right-wing media and changed the course of American conservatism. Today, we look back on Rush Limbaugh’s career and how he came to…

The Sunday Read: ‘The Man Who Turned Credit Card Points Into an Empire’

In recent years, travel — cheap travel, specifically — has boomed. Like all booms it has its winners (including influencers and home-sharing platforms like Airbnb) and its losers (namely locals and the environment). Somewhere in that mix is The Points Guy, Brian Kelly, who runs a blog that helps visitors navigate the sprawling, knotty and…

Kids and Covid

The end of summer 2021 has been earmarked as the time by which most American adults will be vaccinated. But still remaining is the often-overlooked question of vaccinations for children, who make up around a quarter of the U.S. population. Without the immunization of children, herd immunity cannot be reached. Today, we ask when America’s…

A Battle for the Soul of Rwanda

The story of how Paul Rusesabagina saved the lives of his hotel guests during the Rwandan genocide was immortalized in the 2004 film “Hotel Rwanda.” Leveraging his celebrity, Mr. Rusesabagina openly criticized the Rwandan government, and is now imprisoned on terrorism charges. Today, we look at Mr. Rusesabagina’s story tells us about the past, present…

The Blackout in Texas

An intense winter storm has plunged Texas into darkness. The state’s electricity grid has failed in the face of the worst cold weather there in decades. The Texas blackouts could be a glimpse into America’s future as a result of climate change. Today, we explore the reasons behind the power failures. Guest: Clifford Krauss, a…