Month: December 2020

Evicted During the Pandemic

For years there has been an evictions crisis in the United States. The pandemic has made it more acute. On today’s episode, our conversations with single mother of two from Atlanta over several months during the pandemic. After she lost her job in March, the bottom fell out of her finances and eviction papers started…

Should Facebook Be Broken Up?

This episode contains strong language. When the photo-sharing app Instagram started to grow in popularity in the 2010s, the chief executive of Facebook, Mark Zuckerberg, had two options: build something comparable or buy it out. He opted for the latter. The subsequent $1 billion deal is central to a case being brought against Facebook by…

Hacked, Again

Undetected for months, sophisticated hackers working on behalf of a foreign government were able to breach computer networks across a number of U.S. government agencies. It’s believed to be the handiwork of Russian intelligence. And this is far from the first time.  Today, why and how such hacks keep happening and the delicate calculation that…

America’s First Coronavirus Vaccinations

North Dakota and New Orleans have been hit particularly hard by the coronavirus. On today’s episode, we speak to health care workers in both places as they become some of the first to receive and administer the vaccine, and tap into the mood of hope and excitement tempered by a bleak fact: The battle against…

The U.S. Approves a Vaccine

The Food and Drug Administration authorized Pfizer’s Covid-19 vaccine for emergency use on Friday, clearing the way for millions of highly vulnerable people to begin receiving the vaccine within days. The authorization is a historic turning point in a pandemic that has taken more than 290,000 lives in the United States. With the decision, the…

The Sunday Read: ‘Lovers in Auschwitz, Reunited’

Amid the death and desperation of the Auschwitz concentration camp, two inmates, David Wisnia and Helen Spitzer, found love. On today’s episode, the story of how they found each other — first within the camp and again, seven decades later. This story was written by Keren Blankfeld and recorded by Audm. To hear more audio…

A Guide to Georgia’s Senate Runoffs

In three weeks, an election will take place that could be as important as the presidential vote in determining the course of the next four years. The Jan. 5 runoff elections in Georgia will determine whether two Republican senators, David Perdue and Kelly Loeffler, keep their seats. If their Democratic challengers, Jon Ossoff and the…

Why Did the U.S. Turn Down Vaccine Doses?

From the start of the pandemic, the Trump administration said it was committed to ordering and stockpiling enough potential vaccine doses to end the outbreak in the United States as quickly as possible. But new reporting from The Times has revealed that Pfizer, the maker of the first vaccine to show effectiveness against the coronavirus,…

The Beginning of the End of the Pandemic

In Britain, news that the country had become the first to start administering a fully tested coronavirus vaccine was met with hope, excitement — and some trepidation. Amid the optimism that normal life might soon resume, there is also concern. Has the vaccine been developed too fast? Is it safe? On today’s episode, we examine…

Trump Shut the Door on Migrants. Will Biden Open It?

Caitlin Dickerson, an immigration reporter for The Times, says there is one word that sums up the Trump administration’s approach to border crossing: deterrence. For nearly four years, the U.S. government has tried to discourage migrants, with reinforced walls, family separation policies and threats of deportation. Those policies have led to the appearance of a…