Month: October 2020

A Partisan Future for Local News?

Local news in America has long been widely trusted, and widely seen as objective. But as traditional local papers struggle, there have been attempts across the political spectrum to create more partisan outlets. Few can have been as ambitious or widespread as the nationwide network of 1,300 websites and newspapers run by Brian Timpone, a…

The Shadow of the 2000 Election

What does the specter of the 2000 election mean for the upcoming election? The race between George W. Bush and Al Gore that year turned on the result in Florida, where the vote was incredibly close and mired in balloting issues. After initially conceding, Mr. Gore, the Democratic nominee, contested the count. What followed was…

The Field: Why Suburban Women Changed Their Minds

In America’s increasingly divided political landscape, it can be hard to imagine almost any voter switching sides. One demographic group has provided plenty of exceptions: white suburban women. In the past four years, the group has turned away from the president in astonishing numbers. And many of them are organizing — Red, Wine and Blue…

The Sunday Read: ‘My Mustache, My Self’

During months of pandemic isolation, Wesley Morris, a critic at large for The New York Times, decided to grow a mustache. The reviews were mixed and predictable. He heard it described as “porny” and “creepy,” as well as “rugged” and “extra gay.” It was a comment on a group call, however, that gave him pause….

Sudden Civility: The Final Presidential Debate

At the start of Thursday night’s debate its moderator, Kristen Welker of NBC News, delivered a polite but firm instruction: The matchup should not be a repeat the chaos of last month’s debate.  It was a calmer affair and, for the first few segments, a more structured and linear exchange of views.  President Trump, whose…

A Peculiar Way to Pick a President

The winner-take-all system used by the Electoral College in the United States appears nowhere in the Constitution. It awards all of a state’s electors to the candidate with the most votes, no matter how small the margin of victory. Critics say that means millions of votes are effectively ignored. The fairness of the Electoral College…

Social Media and the Hunter Biden Report

Facebook, Twitter and YouTube have invested a significant amount of time and money trying to avoid the mistakes made during the 2016 election. A test of those new policies came last week, when The New York Post published a story that contained supposedly incriminating documents and pictures taken from the laptop of Hunter Biden. The…

A Pivotal Senate Race in North Carolina

In the struggle to control the U.S. Senate, one race in North Carolina — where the Republican incumbent, Thom Tillis, is trying to hold off his Democratic challenger, Cal Cunningham — could be crucial. North Carolina is a classic purple state with a split political mind: progressive in some quarters, while firmly steeped in Southern…

The Field: Energizing the Latino Vote

This episode contains strong language.  In the last decade, elections have tightened in Arizona, a traditionally Republican stronghold, as Democrats gain ground. According to polls, Joe Biden is leading in the state — partly because of white suburban women moving away from President Trump, but also because of efforts to activate the Latino vote. Will…

The Sunday Read: ‘Jim Dwyer, About New York’

Jim Dwyer, a Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist for The New York Times, died earlier this month. He was 63. Throughout his nearly 40-year career, Jim was drawn to stories about discrimination, wrongly convicted prisoners and society’s mistreated outcasts. From 2007, he wrote The Times’s “About New York” column — when asked whether he had the best…